Tag Archives: Mission San Antonio de Padua

Flower Tumbles is now a Kindle title!

The Esselen Tribe lived in southern Monterey County near the headwaters of the Arroyo Seco River for many thousands of years. As with most of California’s Native Americans, their way of life disappeared – along with most of them – in the 19th and early 20th Centuries. This story is set before the great disruptions and attempts to offer a glimpse of Esselens as they once were. Its unlikely hero is a young boy who confronts one of the greatest dangers to his small tribe – an engraged grizzly bear.

Art Salvagno and I had a great time working on this story back in 1981 and again when we revised it in 1995. Ed Haskell offered patient and indispensable service in creating this Kindle edition. Sadly, we had to lose some of Art’s great double-page illustrations when converting the story to the required format. We’ll tinker with our effort in coming months and try to wedge some of the drawings back in – I promise!

By the by, Flower Tumbles won the Salinas Californian’s 1981 John Steinbeck Award for best fiction – not too shabby!

It’s free on Kindle unlimited and otherwise $2.99. Here’s the Amazon link:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06Y5NSHX4/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1491901764&sr=1-1&keywords=flower+tumbles+walton

Teacher Pals, here’s a link to  lesson plans posted on TPT. They’re good, if I do say so myself!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Flower-Tumbles-lessons-and-activities-for-the-Steinbeck-Award-winning-story-3115748

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Filed under Front Page, published story

Mission Days – April 1st, 2017

Mission San Antonio de Padua holds an annual celebration of California history. I was most pleased to participate in the 2017 event as story-teller and visiting author. The hundreds of visitors and dozens of presenters enjoyed an April spring day – mild sunshine, warm breezes and perfume of wildflowers – that only the  San Antonio Valley can produce – a heavenly visit to old California. I got to share Native American stories about silly Tarantula and how Kangaroo Rat got his blackened tail. I hope to be included once again next year!

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Principia Ponderosa is out!

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Principia Ponderosa (Third Flatiron Anthologies Book 18) just came out today. “Welcome to the “Principia Ponderosa,” land of wide-open spaces and
dark dreams. This new anthology from Third Flatiron features 17
stories that combine elements of the Western with other literary
genres, including steampunk, fantasy, occult, and horror. We invite
you to mount up and ride with us into the sunset.” My “La Loca” is included, though it takes place somewhat after sunset!

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El Niño’s Tears

mission days

Photo by Ed Haskell

Friend Ed Haskell’s gift and craft is to find and capture transcendent images. I try to kindle images in others’ minds by relating what I see in words. It’s a gratifying surprise when it turns out that he and I perceive the same thing. I think this happened at Mission Days last month. You be the judge:

http://www.quailbellmagazine.com/the-unreal/poem-el-ninos-tears

 

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Tarantula and Black Maggie!

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I spent a good part of yesterday telling tall tales at Mission San Antonio de Padua.  It was Mission Days – time for music, food, stories, remembrance and laughter!  If that sounds like a fiesta to you, then you’re absolutely in tune with what was going on.  If you weren’t there, you missed a great time, but there’s always next year! My bit was to tell Native American and early settler stories.  I had a good audience (even if I dragooned a couple of them, though without the help of the dragoon re-enactors outside) and worked a new story into the mix. Catch me sometime for a rendition of “Tarantula”. It’s not what you think, but it’s okay if you think it anyway.

P.S. Phyllis and I were married in this wonderful room exactly 43 years ago.

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Filed under Author Visits, Front Page